ARC Flash Hazard Study

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Full Service Electrical Contractors

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Uniformed Service Electricians

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24/7/365 Emergency Service

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NFPA 70E Compliant

ARC Flash Hazard Study Services

It’s a commonly known fact that electricity can shock you, but in most industrial environments, electricity can also create a large explosion called an arc flash.

How large will an electrical arc flash be? That’s a question you definitely need an answer for. Craft Electric & Maintenance will help you answer that question as well as specify exactly what PPE your staff should be wearing when working near any equipment that has the potential for arc flash.

We also provide training for your employees so that they know everything they should about working safely in and around an arc flash zone.

Further, we identify voltage which is critical when performing your shock risk assessment, as required by NFPA 70E.

Have you performed an ARC Flash Hazard study recently?

We’ve been helping facilities with ARC Flash Hazard Studies since 2009. Be certain that your equipment and employees are safe and productive.. 770-979-9293 or info@craftelectricinc.com

Arc Flash FAQs

What is ARC Flash?

An arc flash is the light and heat produced as part of an arc fault. An arc fault is a type of electrical explosion or discharge that results from a low-impedance connection through air to ground or another voltage phase in an electrical system.

What are the benefits of ARC Flash Analysis & Assessment?

An Arc Flash Assessment and Analysis is a study of a facility’s power system to determine the incident energy available at specific electrical devices that employees would be exposed to while “interacting with” the electrical equipment at the facility.

The output of the Assessment & Analysis is a determination and labeling of the PPE required of the electrical devices, suitability of the devices for service as installed and identification of any miss-coordination issues involved as the system is currently installed and configured.

What is my facility required to do as it relates to ARC Flash?

There are numerous OSHA and NFPA requirements related to ARC Flash. They are as follows:

  • OSHA 1910.132 requires that employers identify and protect their workers from workplace hazards. Every industrial / commercial power system includes inherent risks – specifically electrical shock and arc flash, anytime employees are “interacting with” electrical equipment while energized. Interacting with electrical equipment includes operation of fully enclosed switches and power circuit breakers as well as any exposure to energized equipment or circuit parts, including all energized testing or troubleshooting activities.

  • NFPA 70E – Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, Section 110.1 – requires “The employer shall implement and document an overall electrical safety program that directs activity appropriate to the risk of electrical hazards. The electrical safety program shall be implemented as part of the employer’s overall occupational health and safety management system, when one exists.” Section specifically includes identifying and quantifying the risks of both shock and arc flash hazards, before work begins.

  • NFPA 70E, Section 130.5 Arc Flash Analysis – requires an arc flash risk assessment shall be performed to determine the risk, safety related work practices required, the arc flash boundary, the incident energy at the working distance, and the PPE that people within the arc flash boundary shall use. This assessment shall be reviewed at intervals not to exceed 5 years.

  • NFPA 70E Section 130.5 (H) Labeling – requires all equipment “likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized shall be field marked” … with a label containing arc flash risk identification, severity of the risk, arc flash boundary and required PPE level among other things. This includes any energized testing or troubleshooting activity..

  • NFPA 70E, Section 110.3 (A) Host Employer Responsibilities – requires that host employers of contractor or outside service personnel are responsible for notifying the contractor of the hazards they may encounter in the performance of their work. This holds the host employer / facility owner responsible for identifying the hazards a contractor may encounter on the site. Therefore, using contract maintenance and electrical workers does not reduce the need for arc flash analysis.

What are the OSHA requirements related to ARC Flash?

OSHA 1910.132 requires that employers identify and protect their workers from workplace hazards. Every industrial / commercial power system includes inherent risks – specifically electrical shock and arc flash, anytime employees are “interacting with” electrical equipment while energized. Interacting with electrical equipment includes operation of fully enclosed switches and power circuit breakers as well as any exposure to energized equipment or circuit parts, including all energized testing or troubleshooting activities.

What are the NFPA requirements related to ARC Flash?

There are several NFPA requirements related to ARC Flash. They are as follows:

  • NFPA 70E – Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, Section 110.1 – requires “The employer shall implement and document an overall electrical safety program that directs activity appropriate to the risk of electrical hazards. The electrical safety program shall be implemented as part of the employer’s overall occupational health and safety management system, when one exists.” Section specifically includes identifying and quantifying the risks of both shock and arc flash hazards, before work begins.
  • NFPA 70E, Section 130.5 Arc Flash Analysis – requires an arc flash risk assessment shall be performed to determine the risk, safety related work practices required, the arc flash boundary, the incident energy at the working distance, and the PPE that people within the arc flash boundary shall use. This assessment shall be reviewed at intervals not to exceed 5 years.
  • NFPA 70E Section 130.5 (H) Labeling – requires all equipment “likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized shall be field marked” … with a label containing arc flash risk identification, severity of the risk, arc flash boundary and required PPE level among other things. This includes any energized testing or troubleshooting activity..
  • NFPA 70E, Section 110.3 (A) Host Employer Responsibilities – requires that host employers of contractor or outside service personnel are responsible for notifying the contractor of the hazards they may encounter in the performance of their work. This holds the host employer / facility owner responsible for identifying the hazards a contractor may encounter on the site. Therefore, using contract maintenance and electrical workers does not reduce the need for arc flash analysis.
How often should an ARC Flash Analysis & Assessment be performed?

NFPA 70E, Section 130.5 Arc Flash Analysis – requires an arc flash risk assessment shall be performed to determine the risk, safety related work practices required, the arc flash boundary, the incident energy at the working distance, and the PPE that people within the arc flash boundary shall use. This assessment shall be reviewed at intervals not to exceed 5 years.

Just Wanted to Say Thanks

I just wanted you to know that we lost power due to a fuse blowing on the Georgia Power side. We did not suffer any major effects because of this. The breakers did trip and we did not burn up any motors or drives. In the past we did have a lot of the items go bad due to losing a leg. I attribute this to the service you and your company provided for us. We are also seeing where breakers are tripping out and not our switch gear, which is what we want. I have relayed this to our owner and he was impressed. Once again I just wanted to say thanks for you and your excellent service. Please use us as a sounding board anytime.

W. Scott Couch
Maintenance Manager / Athens & Macon, GA
McCann Aerospace

Second to None Service

Our plant has partnered with Craft Electric & Maintenance since 1990. The approach they take with serving our needs is second to none. Whether we are installing new equipment and controls, cleaning and maintaining existing equipment or outfitting a new production facility, we know that Craft understands our unique requirements. We highly recommend Craft Electric & Maintenance.

Thomas R. | Plant Director

Excellent Training

We recently engaged with Craft Electric & Maintenance for ARC Flash safety training for our manufacturing plant electrical staff members. We had very high expectations going into the training and we were very pleased with the subject matter, training staff and program overall. We highly recommend working with Craft Electric & Maintenance on regular safety training.

Adam D. | Safety Director

Always Reliable

It has been our experience with Craft Electric & Maintenance that their staff, service, training and advice have always been reliable and backed by a long-term expertise as an Industrial Electrical Contractor. We rely on them for not only our 24/7 operations but equally as important, for the safety of our employees.

David S. | Plant Manager

News & Events

Congratulations Jay Godfrey

We would like to congratulate Jay Godfrey our Vice President for obtaining his NFPA Certification as an Electrical Safety Compliance Professional “CESCP.”

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